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2017 Halloween Contacts Are Here!

Dressing up for Halloween?  We have Halloween contact lenses! Order your costume lenses early to make sure you get the best selection of what you want.  Contact lenses can be ordered in non-prescription styles, as well as in powers ranging from -0.25 to -6.00 diopters.  

To make the ordering process for your Halloween lenses simple and fast, download our Release Form for Halloween Contacts and email it back to us at info@acuityvision.com.  

The deadline to order contacts in time for Halloween is October 17th, but popular styles and powers run out of stock well before the order deadline! Call us at 415-673-2020 or email phil@acuityvision.com to order now!

 

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Gesundheit! Allergy Season is Here!

Although not comprehensive, the table below illustrates some of the most commonly available products from each category of allergy treatment classified as oral antihistamines, topical antihistamines, anti-inflammatories such as NSAIDS and corticosteroids, and artificial tears. When using multiple eye drops, ensure drug efficacy by spacing instillation of eye drops 5 minutes apart.

Popular Allergy Therapies
 

Over-the-Counter

Prescription Required

Oral Antihistamines

Claritin, Allegra, Zyrtec, Benadryl

Clarinex, Palgic, Atarax

Topical Antihistamines

With Mast Cell Stabilizers: Alaway, Claritin Eye, Zaditor

With Naphazoline HCl: Opcon-A, Naphcon-A, Visine-A

Patanol, Pataday, Pazeo, Lasticraft, Bepreve, Optivar, Emadine, Livostin

NSAID drops

None

Acular, Acuvail

Corticosteroids

None

Lotemax, Alrex, Vexol, Pred Mild, Fluromethalone (FML)

Artificial Tears

Retaine, Systane, Refresh, Optive, Blink, Genteal

None

Top Six Tips for Maintaining Healthy Eyes

Follow these six common-sense tips for the overall health of your eyes.  

1. Get Regular Eye Check Ups

  • Get your eyes checked every one to two years to make sure you don’t have any eye diseases such as glaucoma or macular degeneration.
  • Allow your eye doctor to check that your glasses and contact lenses are the correct prescription.  Bring any glasses you currently use.  If you wear contacts, wear them to your appointment and bring along your last written contact prescription or your contact lens packaging.
  • If you suffer from any medical conditions, let your eye doctor know.  Many systemic diseases can also affect the health of your eyes, such as diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, thyroid disorders, etc.

  2. Practice Good Contact Lens Habits

  • Wash your hands before handling contacts.
  • Replace contacts as recommended by your eye doctor (every day, two weeks, month, or quarter).  Extending the life of your contacts can lead to decreased comfort and breathability, as well as corneal problems.
  • Avoid sleeping in contacts, unless approved by your eye doctor, in which case you will be fit FDA-approved extended wear contacts.
  • Clean your contacts daily using solution with disinfecting properties to kill harmful bacteria.  Gently rub your contacts with disinfecting solution before storing them in their case, even if the bottle says “No Rub” on it.  Saline solution DOES NOT disinfect.  Look for multi-purpose solutions that clean, disinfect, and rinse.
  • Rinse your contact lens case with warm water daily and let it air dry with the caps off to avoid harboring bacteria that breeds in moist environment.  Replace your contact lens case every 3-6 months.
  • Avoid using old contacts or old solutions.
  • Get your contact lenses checked every year during your eye exams to make sure they fit properly, allow sufficient oxygen transmission to the cornea, and are the correct prescription.

3. Practice Good Hygiene

  • Avoid touching your eyes before washing your hands to decrease transmission of viruses or bacteria that lead to conjunctivitis (pink eye).
  • Wash your hands after shaking hands with people, sharing keyboards, sharing exercise equipment, or touching any surfaces in public spaces.
  • Never share towels, pillows, or linens with someone who has conjunctivitis.
  • If you have conjunctivitis, stay home from work or school until it clears!  Frequently wash your hands to prevent transmission to those around you.
  • Wash your face daily with a gentle soap, especially around your eyes.

4. Wear UV Sun Protection

  • Protect those peepers from the sun!  Constant sun exposure can lead to early cataract development, cancers of the eye, and macular degeneration.
  • Ask your eye doctor about special lens materials, coatings, and frames that can maximize your protection from the damaging effects of the sun.
  • Wear a hat, sunscreen, and sunglasses whenever you are outdoors.
  • Don’t let the fog fool you!  Even on cloudy, foggy days UV rays can penetrate your eyes and have damaging effects.  Always wear your sunglasses when you are outside or riding in your car.

5. Wear Safety Goggles During Recreation/Sports

  • Having proper equipment for sports or recreation includes wearing protective eye gear.  The sports at highest risk for injuries leading to blindness are those that involve balls, rackets, or sticks.
  • Discuss with your eye doctor any sports or hobbies you have so that he or she can give recommendations on how to protect your eyes.  More than 90 percent of all eye injuries can be avoided using the correct protective eyewear.

6. Live a Healthy Lifestyle

  • Make healthy food choices by eating a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and low in saturated fats.  Choose fruits and vegetables that are a good source of vitamin A, C, and E, which are anti-oxidants that can lower the risks of certain eye diseases.  Carrots, broccoli, spinach, papaya, avocados, and berries are a few good sources of anti-oxidants.  Eat lean meats that are low in saturated fats, such as fish and poultry.  Fish is a great source of omega-3 fatty acids, vital to the preservation of vision as people mature.
  • A healthy heart yields healthy eyes! Diseases such as diabetes, high cholesterol, and high blood pressure can increase the risk for glaucoma and other eye diseases that can impact your vision.  Exercise regularly to minimize the risk for developing these diseases.
  • Avoid smoking.  Smoking increases your risk of developing macular degeneration in your lifetime by up to 30 percent.  This is the most common disease in the US that can lead to preventable blindness.   If you currently smoke, quit now and reduce your risk.

Antioxidants & Age-Related Eye Disease

Cataracts and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are the leading causes of visual impairment and acquired blindness in the U.S. These diseases affect millions of aging Americans.

Some recent studies have shown that antioxidant vitamins may decrease the development or progression of cataracts. 

The average daily diet contains approximately 100 mg vitamin C and 9 mg vitamin E (or 12 IU). However, in the studies referenced, benefits were associated with intakes considerably higher than the current average intake. If you find it difficult to increase the level of these antioxidants in your diet, consider taking supplements containing these antioxidants.

Click here for more information by the American Optometric Association's information on what foods and vitamins you need in your diet to help improve your eye health:

http://www.aoa.org/patients-and-public/caring-for-your-vision/nutrition/antioxidants?sso=y

Come Visit Our Interactive Retail Window!

Have you been by yet to see our incredibly cool interactive window display?

We've just installed our new, one-of-a-kind interactive retail window. Touch sensors behind the glass activate a custom circuit to turn on animatronics in the display. It features animated lights that count down and then can be activated again. Current theme is The Circus, but the interactive system can be customized for each seasonal display.  So yes, we'll have lots of fun themes for the window going forward!

This uses capacitive sensing through the glass, just like your smartphone. Also note Acuity Vision's classic motion-activated train that is turned on when someone approaches (using a custom through-the-glass doppler radar sensor circuit).

Click on the link below for a quick demonstration of how it works:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Wp38kN6kU0&feature=youtu.be

Come by and see it for yourself!  

The Final Stats Are In!!

The Final Stats Are In!!

Dr. Lyndi Schmidt is back in the US after her trip to the Philippines and volunteering at the EyeCare WeCare Foundation Medical Vision Mission in Guiguinto and Balagtas. She will be back in the office next week.

The final tally of the vision mission is in. Here's what they were able to do in just five days: 

1,580 -- the total number of patients they saw.
1,337 -- the total number of glasses dispensed.
40 -- the number of surgeries that were recommended.

Dr. Schmidt was part of this mission for three days, and saw hundreds of these patients herself. What a blessing she was for this mission!  Please visit EyeCare WeCare Foundation's Facebook page to see the day-by-day review of how the mission helped over 1,500 patients.  You can also see the post they made giving kudos to Dr. Schmidt and pictures of her work in action here:  EyeCare WeCare Foundation Facebook Page.

Here's what the EyeCare WeCare Foundation posted about Dr. Schmidt's participation in the mission:  

"We were blessed by having another doctor join us for day 2, 3 and part of day 4.  She was Dr. Lyndi Fandino Schmidt, an American/Filipina optometric physician from San Francisco, California, USA.  She and her daughter Nina were a pure blessing to the foundation to help us to keep our motto "Delivering God's Ultimate Vision Plan to the Poor."  She was especially a blessing to Dr. Jim.  Just to have someone helping him examine all the patients in a bus that exceeds at time over 100 degrees.  She brought some of her own instruments that ended up being very helpful to keep the long lines moving.  We were able to see 300+ patients per day. We hope to see her and her daughter on many future missions.  Than you Dr Lyndi.  No one can realize how hard it is to be aboard that hot bus for 8 to 10 hours each day and having to concentrate on each and every patient to help them to the best of our ability."

 

Final Day - Mission Accomplished!!

Day 3 was the last and final day for Dr. Schmidt and her daughter Nina to participate in the EyeCare WeCare Foundation Mission.  The mission will continue for two more days after their departure, so the work is far from being over.  They spent three long days of grueling work, but, as Dr. Schmidt said in her own words, "I walked away feeling like I received just as much from this whole experience as we gave."  

And that is the beauty of volunteer work:  we always get back as much as we give, no matter what it is.  To be paid in the form of a small dessert someone cooked because it was all she could give, or to see a child see the world clearly for the first time, or to help prevent people from going  blind by giving them access to free cataract surgery -- all these things made this an incredibly rewarding experience to be part of for both Dr. Schmidt and her daughter Nina. 

Our eyesight is precious, and we need to care for the general health of our eyes as we do the rest of our bodies.  But when some don't have the proper resources available to do this, they rely on the goodwill of others to provide it.  Over the last three days, Dr. Schmidt has given the gift of eyesight and clear vision to hundreds who desperately needed it.  Thank you Dr. Schmidt and Nina for the wonderful and generous work you have done for all these people in the Philippines!

Below are pictures of Dr. Schmidt's final day at the Mission.  If you would like to help as well, visit the EyeCare WeCare Foundation here:  http://www.eyecarewecare.org.  

 

The new venue for Day 3.  It's cool having a clinic on wheels!!

The new venue for Day 3.  It's cool having a clinic on wheels!!

They parked right in front of the gymnasium.  It's important to choose a venue that has a rooftop in case it rains.

They parked right in front of the gymnasium.  It's important to choose a venue that has a rooftop in case it rains.

Every morning, EyeCare WeCare Foundation CEO Dr. James Weyrich starts with a prayer for patience, strength and thanks for everyone's hard work.

Every morning, EyeCare WeCare Foundation CEO Dr. James Weyrich starts with a prayer for patience, strength and thanks for everyone's hard work.

This 10-month-old baby girl has congenital glaucoma in her right eye.  Her mother noticed that her eye started to look like "mata ng pusa" soon after birth, which means "cat's eye."  She was referring the baby's iris not developing properly, a condition common in congenital glaucoma.

This 10-month-old baby girl has congenital glaucoma in her right eye.  Her mother noticed that her eye started to look like "mata ng pusa" soon after birth, which means "cat's eye."  She was referring the baby's iris not developing properly, a condition common in congenital glaucoma.

This 7-year-old girl is unfortunately completely blind from bilateral congenital glaucoma.  Her mother carried her onto the bus for her examination.  She was referred to Resources for the Blind to learn braille.  

This 7-year-old girl is unfortunately completely blind from bilateral congenital glaucoma.  Her mother carried her onto the bus for her examination.  She was referred to Resources for the Blind to learn braille.  

This woman was losing her vision due to pterygium growth over her left eye due to exposure to wind, sun and dust.  She was scheduled to have it removed.  Once removed, she will regain normal vision.

This woman was losing her vision due to pterygium growth over her left eye due to exposure to wind, sun and dust.  She was scheduled to have it removed.  Once removed, she will regain normal vision.

Open for business!  Nina found her niche in the optical dispensary filling prescriptions.  She is ready to conquer the day!

Open for business!  Nina found her niche in the optical dispensary filling prescriptions.  She is ready to conquer the day!

The mission's host, Judith Tavares-Wong.  Judith is an ophthalmology surgical nurse at Kaiser in Portland, Oregon.  She has family in the Bulacan and knows the area well.  She was the mother hen and provided everyone with transportation, food and lodging arrangements.  Her 12-year-old daughter Claire was also instrumental in assisting the doctors on this mission.  

The mission's host, Judith Tavares-Wong.  Judith is an ophthalmology surgical nurse at Kaiser in Portland, Oregon.  She has family in the Bulacan and knows the area well.  She was the mother hen and provided everyone with transportation, food and lodging arrangements.  Her 12-year-old daughter Claire was also instrumental in assisting the doctors on this mission.  

EyecCare WeCare Foundation directors, Ed and Susan Damilao.  Ed and Susan live in Florida, but come to the Philippines to organize and run all the foundation's eyecare missions throughout the islands.  These two sweethearts celebrated their 43rd wedding anniversary during this mission.  Talk about dedication!

EyecCare WeCare Foundation directors, Ed and Susan Damilao.  Ed and Susan live in Florida, but come to the Philippines to organize and run all the foundation's eyecare missions throughout the islands.  These two sweethearts celebrated their 43rd wedding anniversary during this mission.  Talk about dedication!

It's time to say goodbye!!  Dr. Schmidt and Nina say their farewells as they wait for Dr. Schmidt's mother to pick them up. 

It's time to say goodbye!!  Dr. Schmidt and Nina say their farewells as they wait for Dr. Schmidt's mother to pick them up. 

DAY 2 - HOT, DUSTY AND SWEATY

Dr. Schmidt's second day on the mission proved to be hot, dusty and sweaty.  Overall there were approximately 445 patients on the second day, and Dr. Schmidt saw 245 of them herself!   The volunteers, directors and hosts have all been incredibly accommodating and they all look out for one another and take good care of each other.  Whenever someone is caught wilting in the heat, another is there right by his or her side, offering an ice cold drink or some kind of snack.  

How does the mission work and how do they organize all the people to be seen?  Poor people are screened for eligibility and registered indigents are identified by local social services, local churches, and other service organizations to insure that the people are truly in need and eligible for EyeCare WeCare Foundation services.  Each person is registered and recorded, and their medical history is taken as well as their chief vision complaint.  They are assigned a number and seen in order.  

It might be a long wait before they see a doctor, and it can lead to a long day.  But it's that true sense of volunteerism, joining together and doing selfless work to help the betterment of others that brings out the true teamwork in us.  We are so impressed with Dr. Schmidt and her daughter Nina for their perseverance in volunteering in this mission!

Below are photos of Day 2 of the mission:

The location of Day 2.  Usually the mobile eyecare van will go to different schools, where students from outside schools are also invited to join, as well as any adults who are interested and need eye care.

The location of Day 2.  Usually the mobile eyecare van will go to different schools, where students from outside schools are also invited to join, as well as any adults who are interested and need eye care.

Selfie in the Mobile Eye Clinic.  Dr. Schmidt and her daughter Nina just getting started for the day.  

Selfie in the Mobile Eye Clinic.  Dr. Schmidt and her daughter Nina just getting started for the day.  

Where the people line up to get their glasses once they receive their prescription.  Over 40,000 pairs of glasses were donated to this mission alone!

Where the people line up to get their glasses once they receive their prescription.  Over 40,000 pairs of glasses were donated to this mission alone!

Adults and students waiting to get pretested before seeing the eye doctors. 

Adults and students waiting to get pretested before seeing the eye doctors. 

This man is disabled due to complications of diabetes.  Since he was unable to climb onto the clinic bus, Dr. Schmidt checked his eyes in the waiting area. 

This man is disabled due to complications of diabetes.  Since he was unable to climb onto the clinic bus, Dr. Schmidt checked his eyes in the waiting area. 

This 44-year-old man had his eyes checked and was sent out for pterygium removal surgery.  

This 44-year-old man had his eyes checked and was sent out for pterygium removal surgery.  

 

 

 

Day 1 was a great success!

Dr. Lyndi Schmidt and her daughter Nina have completed their first day of the EyeCare WeCare Mission in the Philippines.

Dr. Schmidt worked with President and Founder Dr. James Weyrich and other volunteers and doctors of the mission yesterday.  Together they saw about 300 patients on their first day, but the true totals will be tallied tomorrow.  Dr. Weyrich wanted to provide the poor people of the Philippines with eye care, but when he realized that only the larger islands have access to health and vision care, he decided to bring the care to them.  He created an eye clinic on wheels, the Mobile Eye Clinic, and each mission brings care to thousands of people who desperately need this care.

Dr. Schmidt and Nina had a long, tireless day yesterday on the first day of the mission.  Nina helped the doctors with eye exams, running the eye chart and by being the scribe (go Nina!).  Dr. Schmidt saw a myriad of patients, for some it was their first eye exam ever and they walked away with new glasses.  Others had more serious conditions from degenerative eye disease, trauma and blindness.

We are so proud of Dr. Schmidt and Nina for volunteering their expertise, care and kindness to people who desperately need it.  If you would like to help as well, you can donate to the EyeCare WeCare Foundation here:  http://www.eyecarewecare.org

Below are some photos of Dr. Schmidt's first day on the mission.

 

Dr. James Weyrich, Dr. Lyndi Schmidt, and Dr. Schmidt's daughter Nina on their first day of the EyeCare WeCare Mission in the Philippines.

Dr. James Weyrich, Dr. Lyndi Schmidt, and Dr. Schmidt's daughter Nina on their first day of the EyeCare WeCare Mission in the Philippines.

Nina Schmidt ready for her first day volunteering at the EyeCare WeCare Mission.

Nina Schmidt ready for her first day volunteering at the EyeCare WeCare Mission.

The Mobile Eye Clinic from the outside.  All the good work happens inside.  Amazing!

The Mobile Eye Clinic from the outside.  All the good work happens inside.  Amazing!

This severely nearsighted 11-year-old girl got her first exam and a new pair of glasses!

This severely nearsighted 11-year-old girl got her first exam and a new pair of glasses!

This 6-year-old boy has unfortunately gone blind in his left eye due to congenital glaucoma.

This 6-year-old boy has unfortunately gone blind in his left eye due to congenital glaucoma.

This 46-year-old man got his first eye exam ever yesterday. He was diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa, an inherited degenerative eye disease which results in progressively poor vision in the dark, eventually causing blindness. His prognosis unfortunately is very poor. 

This 46-year-old man got his first eye exam ever yesterday. He was diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa, an inherited degenerative eye disease which results in progressively poor vision in the dark, eventually causing blindness. His prognosis unfortunately is very poor. 

School kids receiving their first pair of glasses!

School kids receiving their first pair of glasses!

Both adults and children wait all day for their number to be called. Several storms passed through during their wait, but that didn't stop the long line to wait to see the doctor!

Both adults and children wait all day for their number to be called. Several storms passed through during their wait, but that didn't stop the long line to wait to see the doctor!

Happy 11th Anniversary, Acuity Vision Optometry Boutique!

Proudly serving San Francisco and beyond for the past 11 years! I can't imagine a better profession, a better team of opticians and doctors, and a better area to serve. Thank you to all our patrons for your continued support.  Without you, we would not be celebrating Acuity Vision Optometry Boutique's 11th Anniversary this year!

Sincerely,
Lyndi Schmidt, Optometrist and Founder

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ORDER YOUR HALLOWEEN 2015 CONTACTS NOW!

Disguise your eyes this Halloween with these frightfully fun contact lenses and send your friends howling about your costume for months to come! Most designs available in prescription powers 0.00 to -6.00. Deadline to order in time for Halloween is 10/15. Hurry before stock runs out! Before ordering contacts, please print, fill out, and email us this release form.

Kate Spade

We have some gorgeous new Kate Spade frames in stock! Come by and check them out

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Discounted frames

Check out our discounted frame section while they're still here!  

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